Parashat Pekudei Exodus 38:21-40:38

 

Exodus 38:21-40:38

Haftorah Reading

1 Kings 7:51–8:21

Testimony of Yeshua

  • On the ark of the testimony: cts 7:44; Revelation 11:19
  • On the priestly, wedding garments of the saints: atthew 22:12; Ephesians 5:27; Revelation 3:4–5, 18; 19:7–8
  • On the golden band or belt worn by the glorified Yeshua: evelation 1:13
  • On Yeshua, Our Great High Priest, carrying our burdens on his shoulders: atthew 11:28–30; Romans 8:34; 1 Timothy 2:5; Hebrews 7:24–25; 9:11–10:21; 1 John 2:1
  • On the saints’ breastplate of righteousness: phesians 6:14
  • On the 12 tribes of Israel represented in the New Jerusalem: evelation 21:12,19–21
  • On the saints receiving crowns:  Corinthians 9:25; Phil 4:1; 2 Timothy 4:8; James 1:12; 1 Peter 5:4; Revelation 2:10; 3:11 cp. 1 Peter 2:9; Revelation 1:6; 5:10; 20:6
  • On the saints having the name of YHVH written on their foreheads: evelation 14:1, 22:4–5
  • On the saints being holy: omans 6:19, 22; 2 Corinthians 7:1; Ephesians 4:24; 1 Thessalonians 3:13; 4:7; Hebrews 12:14
  • On the saints being spiritual menorahs for YHVH: atthew 5:14–16; Philippians 2:15; Revelation 1:12–13; 2:1
  • On the prayers of the saints being as sweet incense before YHVH’s throne: evelation 5:8; 8:3
  • On the temple of Elohim in heaven: ebrews 9:23–24; Revelation 11:19; 15:5, 8
  • On Yeshua’s sacrifice on the altar for our sins: ebrews 13:10–13; 1 John 2:2; Revelation 13:8
  • On the priesthood: ebrews 5:1–11; 7:1–8:6
  • On YHVH’s glory cloud:  Corinthians 10:1; Revelation 15:8

Outline of This Week’s Parashah

  • —38:21 The Accounting or Sum of the Materials (Gold, Silver and Brass) Used in Constructing the Tabernacle
  • —39:1 Aaron’s Priestly Robes
  • —39:2 The Ephod
  • —39:8 The Breastplate
  • —39:22 The Robe of the Ephod
  • —39:27 Tunics of Linen
  • —39:30 The Golden Head-Plate or Crown
  • —39:33 Moses Inspects the Tabernacle and Its Furnishings and Blesses Them
  • —40:1 YHVH Issues the Command to Set Up the Tabernacle on the First Day of the First Month of the Second Year After the Exodus From Egypt
  • —40:17 The Tabernacle Is Erected
  • —40:35 The Kavod or Glory of YHVH Fills the Tabernacle; The Glory Cloud Leads Israel Through the Wilderness

Study Questions for This Week’s Midrash (Torah Discussion)

1— 38:21, This is the sum of the Tabernacle. Compared to the gold and silver used in the Temples of Solomon and Herod, the amounts listed here in the construction of the Mishkan (Tabernacle) of Moses are insignificant. Both temples fell into enemy hands and were looted and destroyed. Not so with the mishkan. Additionally, the mishkan surpassed both temples in sanctity showing that YHVH places his presence not where there is wealth (or power, prestige, knowledge, acclaim, accolades, credentials), but where there is set-apartness and righteousness. What are your heart motives, priorities and orientation for serving YHVH—for wanting to be a spiritual temple or tabernacle for him to dwell in? Are you seeking to be set-apart and righteous out of a sincere and humble heart or out of a desire for power, prestige, wealth and acclaim in your life and using “sanctification” as an outward facade to look good to others? In 1 Corinthians 1:26–29 we read,

For you see your calling, brethren, how that not many wise men after the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble, are called, but Elohim has chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise; and Elohim has chosen the weak things of the world to confound the things which are mighty; and base things of the world, and things which are despised, has Elohim chosen, yes, and things which are not, to bring to nought things that are: that no flesh should glory in his presence.

 2— 39:1, The holy garments for Aaron. The vestments of the high priest (kohen hagadol) are symbolic of the robes of righteousness that saints should be wearing in preparation for the return of the Messiah. Gold symbolizes purity of heart. Blue symbolizes heaven and spirituality. White linen pictures robes of righteousness. White symbolizes purity and Continue reading

 

Parashah Vayakhel — Exodus 35:1-38:20

Exodus 35:1-38:20

Haftorah Reading

1 Kings 7:13–26, 40–50

Testimony of Yeshua

  • On violating YHVH commands: ebrews 10:26–31
  • On giving to YHVH’s work:  Corinthians 9:1–15
  • On YHVH’s spiritual temple:  Corinthians 3:9–17
  • On spiritual gifts for the purpose of building up the spiritual house of Elohim:  Corinthians 12:4–11; James 1:17
  • On the ministry of the Tabernacle: ebrews 8:1–5; 9:1–28

Outline of This Week’s Parashah (Torah Portion)

  • —35:1 The Sabbath: No Work, No Fires
  • —35:4 The People to Contribute Materials for the Building of the Tabernacle
  • —35:10 The Israelites Invited to Participate in the Construction of the Tabernacle
  • —35:30 The Master Craftsmen Are Selected: Bezalel (of Judah) and Aholiab (of Dan)
  • —36:1 More Than Enough Workers and Materials Pour In
  • —36:8 The Work of Building the Tabernacle Begins: Making the Curtains
  • —36:19 Making the Cover
  • —36:20 Making the Planks (Walls) of the Tabernacle and Their Components
  • —36:35 Making the Partitions for the Interior
  • —36:37 Making the Screen for the Entrance to the Tabernacle
  • —37:1 Making the Ark of the Covenant
  • —37:6 Making the Cover (Mercy Seat) for the Ark
  • —37:10 Making the Table of Showbread
  • —37:17 Making the Menorah
  • —37:25 Making the Altar of Incense
  • —38:1 Making the Elevation Offering Altar
  • —38:8 Making the Bronze Laver
  • —38:9 Making the Linen Fence Around the Outer Courtyard
  • —38:18 The Screen of the Gate of the Courtyard

Study Questions for This Week’s Midrash (Torah Discussion)

1— 35:2, The seventh day … shall be … a set-apart day. In our journey through the Torah, the subject of the seventh day Sabbath keeps popping up. When YHVH said in Exodus 20:8 to “Remember the Sabbath day to keep it set-apart (Heb. kadosh),” he keeps reminding them of it so that they won’t forget it! What does this tell us about the importance YHVH places on the weekly Sabbath? With each reminder, he gives additional instructions about how to keep the Sabbath. (Quickly review YHVH’s instructions in the Torah up to this point pertaining to the Sabbath: Gen 2:2–3; Exod 16:23–30; 20:8–11.)

2— Exodus 35:3, Kindle no fire…on the Sabbath day. There are several prevailing viewpoints on the exact meaning of this passage. Let’s explore them.

The Orthodox Jews take literally the Torah’s prohibition to kindle no fire on the Sabbath. As such, many do not turn on a light switch or start their cars (i.e., fire in the spark plugs) on the Sabbath for fear of violating this command. To counter balance this viewpoint, the Torah does indicate that the priest lit the menorah in the tabernacle each morning, the Sabbath not excluded (Exod 27:21–21; 30:7). So, for ministry purposes, lighting a fire seems not to be prohibited.

There is also the viewpoint that since the next verse (Exod 34:4) begins YHVH’s instructions to build the tabernacle, the immediate context of the Sabbath-fire passage has to do with not starting fires that pertain only to one’s trade or job—in Israel’s case, their job was the building of the mishkan. Fires would have been needed for tanning hides, working with metal, and possibly bending wood and dying cloth along with other activities.

This we know for certain. On the Sabbath, YHVH’s people are not to bake, cook or prepare food from scratch (Exod 16:23), but reheating food seems not to be prohibited—something that is even permitted in some Orthodox Jewish circles today. What is the bottom line issue here? We are to cease creating on the Sabbath, and cooking food from scratch (as opposed to reheating) changes the chemistry of the food which constitutes creating something (i.e., transforming something from its original state into another state). So fires for cooking would have been prohibited, to be sure. Food must be prepared ahead of time on the sixth day.

Is this Torah command forbidding the lighting of fires for heat and light? Some would say yes, since part of preparing for the Sabbath involves insuring that your heating fire and Continue reading

 

Let our robes of righteousness speak louder than our words!

Exodus 39:1, The holy garments for Aaron. The vestments of the high priest (kohen hagadol) are symbolic of the robes of righteousness that saints should be wearing in preparation for the return of the Messiah.

Gold symbolizes purity of heart. Blue symbolizes heaven and spirituality. White linen pictures robes of righteousness. White symbolizes purity and sinlessness. Red represents blood—the blood of Yeshua that cleanses from sin. The high priest wore a belt that represents truth, according to Paul (Eph 6:14). White linen pants represented sexual purity. The white turban represented purity of thought and humility (the opposite of conceit). He wore a gold crown inscribed with the words, “Kadosh l’YHVH” meaning “Set-Apart to YHVH.” The dangling pomegranates represented the fruits of the Spirit of Elohim, which should be manifesting in the life of the saint. The golden bells jingled when the priest walked. As we walk through life, people should hear and see our good spiritual fruits.

All of our actions speak loudly and clearly as to who we are and what we believe. Also, Yeshua said that our words reveal the true condition of our heart (Luke 6:45). How do people really view us? What are we really like when we are alone—our thought life and our words—our secret life? Is there a discrepancy between our secret and public lives? If so why? How set apart and righteous are we … in reality?

If we are called to be a set-apart priesthood then hadn’t we better get busy cleaning up our act and start acting like one?

Jewish tradition tells us that a rope was tied to the leg of the high priest in Second Temple times so that while ministering in the innermost sanctuary of the temple if he was impure and YHVH struck him dead (as happened to Nadab and Abihu, the sons of Aaron, when they offered up strange fire) the corpse could be dragged out by the rope. Doesn’t all this show us that we should take being righteous and set apart seriously? Remember Hebrews 12:14: “Follow peace with all men, and holiness, without which no man will see the Master.”

 

YHVH looks at the heart, not the heart’s “house”

Exodus 38:21, This is the sum of the Tabernacle. Compared to the gold and silver used in the temples of Solomon and Herod, the amounts listed here in the construction of the Mishkan (Tabernacle) of Moses are insignificant.

Both temples fell into enemy hands and were looted and destroyed. Not so with the mishkan. Additionally, the mishkan surpassed both temples in sanctity showing that YHVH places his presence not where there is wealth (or power, prestige, knowledge, acclaim, accolades, credentials), but where there is set-apartness and righteousness.

What are your heart motives, priorities and orientation for serving YHVH—for wanting to be a spiritual temple or tabernacle for him to dwell in? Are you seeking to be set-apart and righteous out of a sincere and humble heart or out of a desire for power, prestige, wealth and acclaim in your life and using “sanctification” as an outward facade to look good to others? In 1 Corinthians 1:26–29 we read,

For you see your calling, brethren, how that not many wise men after the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble, are called, but Elohim has chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise; and Elohim has chosen the weak things of the world to confound the things which are mighty; and base things of the world, and things which are despised, has Elohim chosen, yes, and things which are not, to bring to nought things that are: that no flesh should glory in his presence.

 

Exodus 35:1–38:20 Parashah Vayakhel and Exodus 38:21–40:38 Parashat Pekudei

This is a gospel-oriented Torah study. Our goal is to connect the good news of Yeshua the Messiah (the gospel message) to its Hebraic, pro-Torah roots or foundations. The information given here is more than head knowledge. Understanding and wisdom (the right application of knowledge that is based on truth) is taught thus making biblical truth practical, relevant and applicable to your daily life. The truths of the Bible not only have the power to transform your life here and now for the better, but eventually to take you past the veil of death and into eternity.

This Torah study is subdivided in sections by topic in a magazine format thus making it easy to watch at several sittings.

May you be blessed as you watch this video.

For a free, printable adult and youth Torah study guide on this Torah portion (parashah), please go to http://www.hoshanarabbah.org/parshiot.html

 

Parashat Ki Tisa Exodus 30:11-34:35 Outline & Study

Parashat Ki Tisa (when you take) Exodus 30:11-34:35 Outline & Study Sheet

Haftorah Reading

1 Kings 18:1–39

The Testimony of Yeshua

  • On the gifts of the Spirit: 1 Corinthians 12:1–31
  • On keeping the Sabbath: Hebrews 4:9
  • On the golden calf and idolatry: Acts 7:39–42; 17:29–31; 1 Corinthians 10:1–13
  • Come out wickedness; put on righteousness: 1 Corinthians 6:9–11; 2 Corinthians 6:14–7:1; Hebrews 10:22
  • On the Book of Life: Revelation 3:5; 17:8; 21:27; 22:19; Matthew 11:28
  • On seeing the Father: John 1:18
  • On the grace of Elohim: Titus 3:5
  • On YHVH’s Feasts: Acts 2:1; 20:16; 1 Corinthians 5:8; 16:8
  • On the greater glory of Yeshua, the Second Moses: Hebrews 3:1–6
  • On the letter versus the spirit; first glory versus the second and greater glory: 2 Corinthians 3:1–18; John 17:1–2
  • On the second coming: 2 Peter 3:3–4

Outline of This Week’s Parashah (Torah Portion)

— 30:11 The Census/The Sacred Half-Shekel

30:17 The Bronze Laver

30:22 The Sacred Anointing Oil: Its Contents and Uses

30:34 The Sacred Incense: Its Contents and Uses

31:6 Bezaleel and Oholiab Chosen to Be the Chief Artisans Over the Construction of the Tabernacle/Mishkan

31:12 The Sabbath: A Sign Between YHVH and His People, An Eternal Covenant

31:18 Moses Receives the Tablets

32:1 The Golden Calf Incident

32:7 YHVH’s Anger Against Israel for Their Idolatry

32:11 Moses’ Successful Prayer of Intercession

32:15 Moses Descends From Mount Sinai

32:19 Moses Smashes the Tablets, Grinds the Idol into Powder and Causes the Israelites to Drink It

32:30 Moses Intercedes to YHVH Again on Behalf of the People

33:1 Aftermath of the Golden Calf Incident

33:7 Moses Pitches the Tabernacle/Tent of Meeting Outside the Camp

33:12 Moses Pleads for YHVH’s Presence

33:19 Moses Sees the Glory of YHVH Through the Cleft of the Rock

34:1 The Second Set of Tablets

34:5 YHVH Reveals the Thirteen Attributes of His Mercy

34:8 Moses’ Request; YHVH Seals the Covenant With Israel and Forbids Israel to Make Covenants With the Pagans

34:17 Israel Is Forbidden from Making Idols and Is Commanded to Observe the Feast of Unleavened Bread and Shabbat, Feast of Weeks (Pentecost) and the Feast of Tabernacles (the Three Pilgrimage Festivals)

34:27 Renewal of the Covenant

34:33 The Radiance of Moses’ Face

Study Questions for This Week’s Midrash (Torah Discussion)

1— 30:11–16, Everyone was expected to contribute to the building of the mishkan (tabernacle). What can we learn from this passage about the Israelites’ spirit of giving? How are we about giving of our treasure to the work of YHVH?

2— 30:15 and 16, To make atonement for your souls. Some will read these verses and conclude that one can buy their redemption through charitable giving and therefore circumvent the need to place one’s faith in Yeshua’s atoning death on the cross. Does this passage suggest a theology where man can save himself from his sins by acts of charity? Let’s dig a little deeper to see what these verses are really teaching us.

In this passage, YHVH instructed the Israelites to pay an annual half-shekel temple tax. This money went, in part, toward, the service (verse 16) and constructing of the Tabernacle of Moses (e.g., Keil and Delitzsch Commentary on the OT, vol. 1, p. 459; Exod. 3— 38:21–31), and later toward the purchase of the animals the priests sacrificed (The Temple and Its Service, by Alfred Edersheim, p. 48). In this way, the people were participating vicariously in the act of sacrificing an innocent animal as an offering or atonement for their sins. Again, the Scriptures reveal that this sacrificial system merely Continue reading

 

Grace…A New Testament Concept!? Really?

Exodus 33:12–13, Grace. The mainstream church places a great deal of emphasis on the message of grace. The biblical doctrine of grace finds its roots in this chapter in the Torah and not in the apostolic writings as the mainstream church teaches. The noun grace (Heb. chen) is found six times in chapters 33 and 34. The adjective gracious (Heb. chanan and channuwn)as an attribute YHVH’s character is found three times in chapters 33 and 34. Six is the number of man and three is the number of Elohim. That is to say, the grace of the entire Godhead covers man completely even when his children turn away from him and give into golden calf worship. His grace for his people rejoices or triumphs over his fiery and consuming judgments (Exod 33:4; Jas 2:13; Pss 85:10; 89:14; Mic 7:18; Eph 1:7; Rom 5:8) that they deserve for their stiff-neckness and sinful rebellion against his commands (Exod 33:3).

The Hebrew word for grace is chen/IJ meaning “favor, grace, charm, acceptance.” The Hebrew word chen (found 69 times in the Tanakh), which is translated as grace, in this verse is equivalent to the Greek word charis/cariV, which is found 156 times in the Testimony of Yeshua and is translated as grace 130 times in the KJV. The equivalency of these two words is confirmed by the translators of the Septuagint (the Greek Tanakh) who used charis in place of chen when translating the Hebrew Tanakh into Greek beginning in the third century b.c. According to The TWOT, in the vast majority of occurrences of chen in the Tanakh, the focus of attention is not on the giver, but on the recipient. The emphasis is on the relationship of the superior to an inferior (e.g. a king to his subjects). What this teaches us is that despite sin and rebellion against him, YHVH (the king) is gracious (to humans, his subjects). Contrary to what many in the church have been led to believe, the grace of Elohim is a very prominent theme in the Tanakh. Examples of this include Noah who found grace in YHVH’s eyes (Gen 6:8), or the children of Israel although dead in their sins in Egypt and deserving of YHVH’s wrath, they were saved by the blood of the lamb. There are a number of other references to the grace of Elohim in the Tanakh as well (Gen 18:3; Exod 3:21; 33:16,17; 34:9; Ps 84:11; Zech 12:10).

Exodus 34:6–7 lists various attributes of YHVH’s mercy. He is:

  • compassionate
  • gracious
  • abundant in kindness
  • abundant in truth
  • a preserver of kindness for thousands of generations
  • a forgiver of iniquity, willful sin (transgression) and error (sin)
  • cleanser of our sins

Merciful (verse 6) in Hebrew is the word rachuwm/ OUJR from the root word racham/ OJR meaning “to love, love deeply, have mercy, be compassionate, have tender affection, have compassion.” The TWOT explains that this word refers to a deep love (usually a superior individual for an inferior) rooted in some deep natural bond. It is used for the deep inward feeling we know as compassion, pity, or mercy. This word is found 47 times in the Tanakh, and frequently refers to the love of Elohim for his people (see Ps 103:13; Mic 7:17). Often Elohim’s mercy and grace are linked together (note Exod 33:19; 34:6; 2 Kgs 13:23; Pss 86:15; 111:4; 112:4; 145:8). His mercy and graciousness are at times unconditional upon those he chooses to favor (Exod 33:19), and is upon those who repent of their sins as well (Deut 13:17). The Tanakh elsewhere frequently exults in the attributes of YHVH’s mercy or compassion (see Deut 4:31; 2 Chron 3:9; Neh 9:17,31; Pss 78:38; 102:13; Joel 2:13; Jon 4:2.) Again, can there be any doubt that the “God of Old Testament” is just as loving and merciful as the “God of the New Testament?” It stands to reason that they are, for they are one in the same Divine Personage—and his character is unchangeable (review Mal 3:6; Heb 13:8)!

Numerous parallel passages in the Testimony of Yeshua can be found that are built on these foundational Torah principles of YHVH’s grace and mercy ( Heb 4:16; Rom 3:24; Eph 1:17; 2:4,8; Tit 1:4; 2:11; 3:5; 1 Pet 1:3; Jude 21).